Schooling teachers at school

Today%2C+teachers+attended+a+presentation+by+Cobb+County+employee+Sarah+Kessel+and+ninth+grade+literature+teacher%2C+Laura+Smith.+%E2%80%9CThe+meeting+was+about+different+ways+to+teach+advanced+students+who+may+already+understand+the+material+better+than+others.+Kessel+and+Smith+gave+examples+of+different+methods+to+help+these+students+learn%2C+without+wasting+time+on+knowledge+they+already+acquired%2C%E2%80%9D+said+math+teacher%2C+Brenda+Slater.+
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Schooling teachers at school

Today, teachers attended a presentation by Cobb County employee Sarah Kessel and ninth grade literature teacher, Laura Smith. “The meeting was about different ways to teach advanced students who may already understand the material better than others. Kessel and Smith gave examples of different methods to help these students learn, without wasting time on knowledge they already acquired,” said math teacher, Brenda Slater.

Today, teachers attended a presentation by Cobb County employee Sarah Kessel and ninth grade literature teacher, Laura Smith. “The meeting was about different ways to teach advanced students who may already understand the material better than others. Kessel and Smith gave examples of different methods to help these students learn, without wasting time on knowledge they already acquired,” said math teacher, Brenda Slater.

Rachel Maxwell

Today, teachers attended a presentation by Cobb County employee Sarah Kessel and ninth grade literature teacher, Laura Smith. “The meeting was about different ways to teach advanced students who may already understand the material better than others. Kessel and Smith gave examples of different methods to help these students learn, without wasting time on knowledge they already acquired,” said math teacher, Brenda Slater.

Rachel Maxwell

Rachel Maxwell

Today, teachers attended a presentation by Cobb County employee Sarah Kessel and ninth grade literature teacher, Laura Smith. “The meeting was about different ways to teach advanced students who may already understand the material better than others. Kessel and Smith gave examples of different methods to help these students learn, without wasting time on knowledge they already acquired,” said math teacher, Brenda Slater.

Rachel Maxwell, Reporter

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