The Chant

Gregory helps Chemistry make a comeback

New+to+NC%2C+Honors+Chemistry+teacher+Rebecca+Gregory+prepares+her+students+for+a+lab%E2%80%94+her+favorite+classroom+activity.+The+lab+will+show+her+students+how+to+determine+if+an+element+has+an+ionic+bond+or+covalent+bond%2C+which+students+often+find+difficult+to+understand.
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Gregory helps Chemistry make a comeback

New to NC, Honors Chemistry teacher Rebecca Gregory prepares her students for a lab— her favorite classroom activity. The lab will show her students how to determine if an element has an ionic bond or covalent bond, which students often find difficult to understand.

New to NC, Honors Chemistry teacher Rebecca Gregory prepares her students for a lab— her favorite classroom activity. The lab will show her students how to determine if an element has an ionic bond or covalent bond, which students often find difficult to understand.

Elyssa Abbott

New to NC, Honors Chemistry teacher Rebecca Gregory prepares her students for a lab— her favorite classroom activity. The lab will show her students how to determine if an element has an ionic bond or covalent bond, which students often find difficult to understand.

Elyssa Abbott

Elyssa Abbott

New to NC, Honors Chemistry teacher Rebecca Gregory prepares her students for a lab— her favorite classroom activity. The lab will show her students how to determine if an element has an ionic bond or covalent bond, which students often find difficult to understand.

Elyssa Abbott, Reporter

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The word “chemistry” often triggers groans from students, parents, and even teachers. Notorious for the long hours spent memorizing polyatomic ions and elements, chemistry elicits headaches recalling the periodic table. When students encounter a challenging class, blaming the teacher becomes their first instinct. Although chemistry frustrates students, NC’s new Honors Chemistry teacher Rebecca Gregory makes the notorious class manageable this year.

Gregory first made her teaching debut at Arabia Mountain High School in Dekalb County, where she taught chemistry. She always loved math and chemistry as a child, so she decided to become a chemistry teacher to help students tackle the difficult curriculum.

In college, when forced to work in a lab, Gregory quickly learned the job did not fit her because of her love for social interaction.

“I love working to help others realize their full potential,” Gregory said.

Recognized for its complexity, Gregory understands that chemistry challenges students, but also realizes that the subject cannot just suddenly become easier. Gregory believes that hands-on activities, such as labs, help students understand difficult concepts. Students in her class will participate in captivating labs, like the flame test lab—the most popular with the students. Students received the chance to observe the colors elements give when submerged in a flame. Lastly, to make chemistry bearable, Gregory devotes class time to practicing problems so that the assigned homework becomes feasible.

“Students can then work together through the more difficult parts of chemistry and have me there to help them when they get stuck,” Gregory said.

Year after year, sophomores dread chemistry because of the warnings from upperclassmen. Students come into the course accepting the fate that an A will not come easy throughout the semester. This year, with a new teacher, many students quickly adopted a new attitude about the course as a whole.

Sophomores feel as if the course would challenge them more without a teacher like Ms. Gregory— a teacher who so thoroughly explains the material. With her guidance, the students gain confidence to overcome the tough curriculum. Her energy and enthusiasm for chemistry appeals to her students and makes learning entertaining.

“Due to the various negative comments I heard from upperclassmen, I expected to feel lost at all times, but I, surprisingly, understand the concepts,” sophomore Abbey Corley said.

Chemistry students let out a breath of relief when they realized the subject proves not as difficult as they expected. All credit goes to NC’s new Chemistry teacher, Rebecca Gregory, who encourages students to take in a breath of O2, and start balancing the next equation.

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Gregory helps Chemistry make a comeback