Magnet seniors conclude ASR presentations

January 11, 2016

Magnet+seniors+presented+their+ASR+projects+on+Saturday%2C+January+9.

Kat Shambaugh

Magnet seniors presented their ASR projects on Saturday, January 9.

Students and community members arrived at NC on Saturday, January 9 for the 12th annual senior Magnet research presentations. A year and a half of work through NC’s School for International Studies’ Advanced Scientific Research (ASR) class concluded with Magnet seniors presenting their research projects in front of peers and three qualified community judges.

A student explains her project through a tri-fold board before her presentation. Students created both a powerpoint and a board to fully explain their research project.
Kat Shambaugh
A student explains her project through a tri-fold board before her presentation. Students created both a powerpoint and a board to fully explain their research project.

The Magnet program requires students to take ASR in their junior year of high school; through the course they create and carry out a research project on a topic of their choosing. Presenters must pass with at least a 75% to graduate with the Magnet seal on their diploma.

“It is our goal to prepare our students to become leaders at the university level and beyond and to nurture and support the student’s intrinsic interests in the international environment,” Magnet Coordinator David Stephenson said in his welcome address. “To achieve this, you must be willing to ask questions, share insights, study, embrace challenge, and to give your time and energy to our campus and community. In return, you will graduate prepared for the finest universities and with the critical international understandings needed to engage and lead on a global level.”

Administrators split each room into four or five research projects based on topic. Community volunteers with specializations in certain subject areas judged the presentations, asking the students questions and grading them on their project and explanation. Two moderators, volunteers from the junior class, supervised, introduced the judges and presenters, and timed.

“It was really fun to see the various research that was being presented, especially because I was in the same category room the whole time. It really helped me to see how it will be for me presenting next year and how the judges give feedback,” Junior and moderator Audrey Widmier said.

Senior Cameron Cook presents his research project, “Hip Hop on Aggressive Behavior.” During his presentation, Cook explained to the judges his reason for choosing the topic: “I had always grown up hearing that hip hop lead to fighting and aggressiveness, and when I entered [the Advanced Scientific Research] class I realized I could do a project on this. I really just wanted to stand up for my favorite genre of music.”
Kat Shambaugh
Senior Cameron Cook presents his research project, “Hip Hop on Aggressive Behavior.” During his presentation, Cook explained to the judges his reason for choosing the topic: “I had always grown up hearing that hip hop lead to fighting and aggressiveness, and when I entered [the Advanced Scientific Research] class I realized I could do a project on this. I really just wanted to stand up for my favorite genre of music.”
For most of the senior Magnet students, the presentations were a large source of stress.

“I’m nervous, but that’s normal,” senior Maddie Schohan said before her presentation. “Anytime that you are presenting in front of a group of people there’s always that anxiety that you’re going to mess up, even if you know the information well. I’ve been practicing and reviewing my information, but no matter how much you review you’re always going to worry about forgetting something or being corrected.”

NC’s senior presentations exemplify the Magnet students’ penchant for exceeding expectations. Students worked through the stress of the event on Saturday, ultimately finishing a significant part of their Magnet career and adding another achievement to their resume.

“I hope to continue my research to get a little more accurate data just so I feel more complete, because I didn’t completely finish, but it feels great to know that the presentation is over with and I have done all of this work that I can be proud of,” senior Emory Perry said.

 
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